Clothing Workshop – JM Willow Winds http://jmwillowwinds.com/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 18:26:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jmwillowwinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Clothing Workshop – JM Willow Winds http://jmwillowwinds.com/ 32 32 The Broncos team up with local clothing brand BE A GOOD PERSON to launch the limited-edition “Kickoff Collection” https://jmwillowwinds.com/the-broncos-team-up-with-local-clothing-brand-be-a-good-person-to-launch-the-limited-edition-kickoff-collection/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 18:07:01 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/the-broncos-team-up-with-local-clothing-brand-be-a-good-person-to-launch-the-limited-edition-kickoff-collection/ ENGLEWOOD, Colo. –The Denver Broncos have teamed up with local apparel brand BE A GOOD PERSON (BAGP) to release a limited-edition “Kickoff Collection,” it was announced Tuesday. The collection will be released Friday, September 16 in limited quantities, at BE A GOOD PERSON’s flagship location at RiNo (1360 27th St, Denver, CO 80205) as well […]]]>

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. –The Denver Broncos have teamed up with local apparel brand BE A GOOD PERSON (BAGP) to release a limited-edition “Kickoff Collection,” it was announced Tuesday.

The collection will be released Friday, September 16 in limited quantities, at BE A GOOD PERSON’s flagship location at RiNo (1360 27th St, Denver, CO 80205) as well as online at beagoodperson.com at noon MT. Additionally, it will be available at the Broncos Team Store in Empower Field at Mile High and on Fanatics.com.

“The Broncos are proud to partner with a top local brand like BE A GOOD PERSON,” said Broncos chief marketing officer Ted Santiago. “This one-of-a-kind collection encapsulates what it means to be a Bronco.”

The collection will feature seven unique co-branded pieces that combine BAGP’s high-end streetwear designs with the rich customs and caliber of the Denver Broncos organization. Each piece unites the iconic evolution of the Broncos that fans have celebrated for over 60 years with the artistic and versatile style of BE A GOOD PERSON.

As part of the “Kickoff Collection,” BE A GOOD PERSON and the Denver Broncos plan to donate art supplies to the 20 clubs operated by Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Denver, Colorado. In addition to art supply donations, BAGP will host an art workshop with a Metro Denver Boys & Girls Club at the end of September where club members can customize their own BE A GOOD PERSON garment. The Denver Broncos have partnered with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Denver since 2003.

“Our inspiration was rooted in showcasing the rich history of the Broncos, and as a Colorado native, this collaboration brought back memories of my earliest memories as a fan,” said BAGP co-founder Darian Simon. “We’ve seen the logo morph and evolve over the years, and we wanted to highlight it and appeal to all demographics of Broncos fans everywhere. Even those who start out as simple streetwear enthusiasts and launch these logos , and instantly become a fan through the love of the garment.”

BAGP is a Denver lifestyle and apparel brand whose purpose is to refresh perspectives and remind us all that optimism can be all it takes to see good in the world. Our garments are designed to be functional and fashionable, while serving as a simple reminder of the most fundamental concept; be a good person. Celebrating seven years and clothing shipped to six continents later, BAGP strives to continue sharing its message while creating clothing that is durable, versatile and comfortable. For more information, visit beagoodperson.com.

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The mold costume hire business attracts people from across the UK to its quirky workshops https://jmwillowwinds.com/the-mold-costume-hire-business-attracts-people-from-across-the-uk-to-its-quirky-workshops/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 10:47:23 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/the-mold-costume-hire-business-attracts-people-from-across-the-uk-to-its-quirky-workshops/ Deeside.com > News Job : Sun Sep 11, 2022 Updated: Sun 11 Sep Listen to this article A Mold costume hire business attracts people from across the UK to attend its quirky workshops where people can make a range of historic clothing, from Victorian bustles to glamorous 1920s cocoon coats. Paula Cain of Cambria Costume […]]]>

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Job : Sun Sep 11, 2022

Updated: Sun 11 Sep

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A Mold costume hire business attracts people from across the UK to attend its quirky workshops where people can make a range of historic clothing, from Victorian bustles to glamorous 1920s cocoon coats.

Paula Cain of Cambria Costume Hire said she was delighted with the interest in her workshops, which are held at her business in Mold’s High Street.

The experienced costume designer and supervisor celebrates 10 years of running her business this year, having moved from Sealand Road near Chester to Mold in 2021.


She enjoys sharing her skills with a wide range of people who want to create their own costumes or clothing, including Peaky Blinder style hats or 1920s style cloche hats.

Paula, from Aston, has been making elaborate and ornate costumes for theatrical purposes for over 20 years now. His work has graced the stage in a number of productions, from the Liverpool Everyman panto to various shows at the Buxton Opera House.

She also produced outfits for 90s Liverpool pop singer and Eurovision contestant Sonia, whose single You’ll Never Stop Me From Loving You reached the top of the charts in 1989.

She also regularly produces historical costumes for heritage attractions and, in contrast, glitzy costumes for tribute acts to rock bands like The Darkness and KISS.

Demonstrating his versatility in costume design and production, his latest commission includes a range of plant-inspired dress-up costumes for children for the RHS Bridgewater site which opened earlier this year.

One was a cactus costume and another was to represent the life cycle of a plant, depicting the journey from seed to apple. Paula is currently making a children’s costume that represents global warming.

She also produced a stunning Welsh National Dress Competition dress for Hannah Hunter, who went on to win the Face of the World competition held in Paris. She also branched out into producing a range of Game of Thrones-style medieval costumes.

Now Paula, who has also been asked to provide the costumes for Chester Mystery Plays 2023, having done so for two previous cycles, is preparing to hold another series of workshops. These include a chance to craft a 1920s-style cloche hat, a coat, and an evening bag known as the Crosshair.

A satisfied former workshop participant has created his own Victorian animation using black satin, ready for a night out at his local pub.

Paula said people come to Mold to attend her workshops from as far away as Swansea, Kent and Gateshead. A corsetry workshop attracts people of various ages, from 15 to 60, with corsets that can be worn with jeans for example.

Costumes made in the workshops or available for hire from Paula can be used for a variety of occasions, from a night out with friends or Steampunk events to theatrical productions, including pantos.

Upcoming workshops at Cambria Costume Hire, which range from those designed for complete beginners to those with intermediate sewing skills, include a 1920s Fashion Weekend taking place in November.

Paula said: “I’ve always been fascinated by historical costumes and enjoyed drawing inspiration from reading historical books over the years. I think the old way of doing things really appeals to me, with the traditional way things were done and structured to create a certain form.

“I decided to start costume workshops because I felt there was nothing else like it in this field.

“I’ve had people come to workshops wearing historical costumes and then someone else was a rocker girl who wanted to wear a Victorian-style black satin dress to the pub on a Saturday night.

“I think people like to learn new skills and want to do something different.

“A lot of people have told me that they loved making ’20s-style cocoon coats, for example.

“They like to make historical costumes that could also be used for cosplay or Steampunk events. When people make hats, they love it and tend to leave the workshop wearing them.

“I encourage anyone willing to try to contact me for more information. We have workshops for all levels of sewing and we have sewing machines here. Depending on the workshop, people may wish to bring their own fabric.

For more information on workshops or costume hire, visit cambriacostumehouse.co.uk.





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  • Chester Racecourse caterers distribute over 2,500 meals to community after race canceled

  • Did you spot something? You have a story? Send a Facebook message | A direct message to Twitter | Email: News@Deeside.com

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    Waubonsee Launches Latinx Heritage Month – Shaw Local https://jmwillowwinds.com/waubonsee-launches-latinx-heritage-month-shaw-local/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/waubonsee-launches-latinx-heritage-month-shaw-local/ In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, Waubonee Community College is hosting several events for students, alumni, and the community to learn about and enjoy tradition and culture together. latinos. The programming will revolve around family activities and highlight Latinx leaders who have had a positive impact on communities and different […]]]>

    In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, Waubonee Community College is hosting several events for students, alumni, and the community to learn about and enjoy tradition and culture together. latinos. The programming will revolve around family activities and highlight Latinx leaders who have had a positive impact on communities and different industries. These in-person events are open to the public and will be held from September 15 to October 15.

    • ¡Launch of Latinx Heritage Month and meet our alumni: Do you identify as Hispanic or Latinx? Did you attend Waubonnee as a college student? Come join our Latinx alumni and meet the Latinx Heritage Month committee for an afternoon of amistad y tradiciones “friendship and traditions”. Alumni will share stories of how Waubonnee has been instrumental in their academic and professional success. Attendees will enjoy a nostalgic afternoon filled with stories, networking, traditional Mexican treats, music, and a fun game of Mexican Loteria. This meetup will be held at the Latinx Resource Center (LRC) on Aurora’s downtown campus on Thursday, September 15 at 2 p.m.
    • STEM al Estilo Latinx: Waubonee Community College and Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy have partnered to discuss the importance of increasing Latinx representation in emerging fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. Join us to explore all that the world of science has to offer. This discussion will take place on Thursday, September 22 at 6 p.m. at Aurora Downtown Campus. Family activities will also be offered for the enjoyment of all.
    • Allilanchu! An interactive workshop on Quechua language and culture: The Quechua languages ​​are the most widely spoken indigenous languages ​​of the Americas, with up to 10 million speakers combined. Historically known as the language of the Inca civilization, Quechua is spoken in countries like Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia and has a great influence on the richness of culture and tradition. Carlos Molina-Vita, a professor at the University of Illinois, will teach participants the main features of this language, including basic greetings and the numbering system of Southern Quechua languages. Agriculture, clothing and music will also be featured. This interactive workshop will take place on Wednesday, September 28 at 5 p.m.
    • Eschucha and Baila Conmigo: Come listen, eat and dance with us on Thursday, September 29 at noon at the Student Center Café at the Sugar Grove Campus. We’ll be playing popular Latinx music, which includes Cumbia, Salsa, Bachata, Reggaeton, and more! Refreshments will be offered.
    • Fighting the stigma: Latinx with Disabilities – Join us for a panel discussion on understanding and working with Latinx/e communities and disabilities. Members of our college and Fox Valley area communities will share their experiences and provide helpful information on how best to support Latinx/e people with disabilities.
    • Encanto Night: Come experience the magic of Disney’s Encanto on Thursday, October 6 at 5 p.m. at Aurora Downtown Campus. This free film screening, in conjunction with the Waubonse Student Life Department and the Aurora Public Library District, will take you on a journey to Colombia, where you will discover the extraordinary gifts of the Madrigal familia. Bring the family and enjoy quiet activities including fun crafts, story time, and snacks while the movie is shown. Feel free to make yourself comfortable and bring your own blankets and pillows. Estamos encantados “We are delighted” to welcome you.
    • Fiesta y Kermes “Celebration of Latin cultures” will take place on Friday, October 7 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Immerse yourself in Latinx culture by experiencing a kermes at Aurora Downtown Campus. The kermes aims to celebrate Latinx Heritage Month with a program filled with food vendors, community organizations, live music, and the engagement of our students and community. This event is open to the public!
    • ¡Siempre Pa’late! : Take a peek at esteemed Latinx leaders in different industries and fields by visiting the bulletin boards during a rotating schedule at each of Waubonsee’s four campuses from September 15 through October 15.

    To learn more about how Waubonse celebrates and recognizes Latinx leaders during Hispanic Heritage Month and Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week and to receive event details, visit waubonsee.edu/latinxheritagemonth.

    ]]>
    Former Southland woman celebrates her 101st birthday https://jmwillowwinds.com/former-southland-woman-celebrates-her-101st-birthday/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 00:17:00 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/former-southland-woman-celebrates-her-101st-birthday/ Provided Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year. Confined to a hospital bed to celebrate her 100th birthday during the confinement of 2021, Dorothy Brazier can this year celebrate her 101st birthday surrounded by her family. Brazier, née Earley, was born on September 8, 1921, and while […]]]>
    Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year.

    Provided

    Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year.

    Confined to a hospital bed to celebrate her 100th birthday during the confinement of 2021, Dorothy Brazier can this year celebrate her 101st birthday surrounded by her family.

    Brazier, née Earley, was born on September 8, 1921, and while last year she was only allowed two visitors to celebrate her birthday, this year she will be able to spend it with her extended family, including her great-grandchildren.

    Dot was born in Dunedin before moving to Nightcaps, Southland in 1942 to live with her husband Bill.

    Bill worked underground in the mines of Ohai, where he had several brushes with death.

    READ MORE:
    * Ohai Coal Battle: Meet the young person fighting against the industry his small town was built on
    * What will happen to mining towns in a coal-free future?
    * Against the current anti-coal position in the smoky town of Southland

    Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year.

    Provided

    Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year.

    There were several mines throughout Nightcaps, Tinkertown and Ohai, both underground and surface, and a private railway line carried a small engine named “Pie Cart” which picked up miners at the station.

    Miners worked in pairs underground. Sometimes the mines would collapse, flood or burst into flames and a siren would sound for everyone to get rid of.

    Dot can remember how one of Bill’s friends died in a coal fall that left Bill half-buried.

    Even 10 years later he would have shards of charcoal coming out of his head which she would pull out with tweezers.

    Motherhood in Southland in the 1940s was different, with no disposable nappies and no snow, causing house pipes to freeze.

    On cold days, Dot would heat smooth stones in the oven for the children to hold and put in their pockets to keep them warm while they went to school.

    In 1950, a fire swept through Nightcaps on a windy day, resulting in the loss of the hotel, town hall, garage, Grant’s linen shop, and Sinclair’s studio.

    Dot said: “Nightcaps was a very tidy little town where everyone knew each other and helped each other”.

    Highlights of her life include friendship, making clothes, food and canes, and playing golf and tennis, but she missed her husband and the friends she lost along the way.

    When asked what the secret to a long life is, Dot says it eludes her.

    Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year.

    Provided

    Dorothy Brazier was born on September 8, 1921 and celebrates her 101st birthday this year.

    ]]>
    Make a difference: Anna Roth develops a website to help other dancers and protect the environment | West https://jmwillowwinds.com/make-a-difference-anna-roth-develops-a-website-to-help-other-dancers-and-protect-the-environment-west/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 08:02:00 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/make-a-difference-anna-roth-develops-a-website-to-help-other-dancers-and-protect-the-environment-west/ WESTERLY – Anna Roth’s love of dance led her to enter the world of philanthropy – at the age of 17. Roth, a high school student who spends her summers at Westerly, last year founded the Leotard Project, a charity that combines all her passions: concern for the environment, a desire to help others and […]]]>

    WESTERLY – Anna Roth’s love of dance led her to enter the world of philanthropy – at the age of 17.

    Roth, a high school student who spends her summers at Westerly, last year founded the Leotard Project, a charity that combines all her passions: concern for the environment, a desire to help others and a desire to ” make a difference”. she says.

    With the stated goal of giving “new purpose to dancewear, one leotard at a time”, Project Leotard “removes economic barriers by providing dancewear to aspiring dancers in underserved communities and promotes environmental sustainability by recycling dancewear so more children can experience the joy of dancing,” Roth writes on the organization’s website.

    ‘I love dancing and I love helping people,’ a cheery Roth said one afternoon last week as she sat inside her parents’ renovated farmhouse and talked about developments. of the project and his hopes for its future.

    Roth, who has danced most of her life, said the idea for the project started when she started thinking about her used dance clothes.

    The only daughter of Carmiña and Ralf Roth, of Westerly and Old Greenwich, Connecticut, Roth said she realized dance clothes and dance shoes could be expensive, quickly outgrowing them. and often thrown away.

    “It’s an expensive sport,” she said.

    Where did all the dancewear end up, she wondered, in the landfill? And what about the dance clothes of his fellow dancers?

    And then, she says, she began to wonder if there weren’t young dancers who had been prevented from starting dancing because they couldn’t afford to buy all the leotards, shoes and pantyhose required.

    “Then I put two and two together,” she said. “And the problem kind of solved itself…or the problems solved each other.”

    Roth, a student at Loomis-Chafee School in Windsor, Connecticut, quickly began curating a collection of gently used leotards, tights, shoes and skirts and set about finding new homes for the items.

    She wrote a fundraising letter, launched a GoFundMe page and started designing the website using a template, she said.

    She also arranged for collection boxes to be placed at local dance schools and began to network in earnest. So far, she’s raised $1,875 of her $5,000 goal.

    She connected with a New Haven organization called Leadership, Education and Athletics in Partnership Inc. (LEAP), which was founded in 1992 by “educators, students and community activists to fight historic youth disengagement of color in the city.”

    “I went to New Haven and met some of the kids,” Roth said. “They were thrilled and grateful.

    “We also donated portable ballet bars and floor coverings,” she added.

    LEAP Chief of Staff Yakeita Robinson said Project Leotard donations have provided “meaningful dance experiences” for a larger group of children. Wearable bars mean the program can be offered at each of the organization’s eight locations, she said, and leotards allow interested kids to practice in real dance clothes.

    “They can actually transition from school clothes to proper dance clothes,” she said, which many kids in the program wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford.

    “It’s very exciting for us,” Robinson said, “and it’s really amazing to see someone so young making the effort to make changes.”

    Robinson said it was rare and “selfless” to see such a young woman so determined to bring about change in the lives of other young people.

    “It may seem like a small thing,” she added, “but who knows? It might spark a passion in another young girl and Anna is one of them.”

    In addition to collecting dancewear, the Leotard Project raises funds “to supplement our inventory through individual donations.”

    Roth, who said she has always been driven by her love of dancing and her eagerness to share her joy in dancing, laughed when she recalled her early days with the art form.

    “I started dancing as soon as I could walk,” she said. “It was the only thing I wanted to do. I even remember my first teacher. She was a woman named Felicity Foote at the Greenwich Ballet Workshop and she terrified me.

    “But I loved the challenge,” she added. “And I wanted to improve.”

    The passion for dancing has remained strong since those early days, said Roth, who is also a member of the varsity dance team at Loomis-Chaffee, where she is also president of the Pelican Pilots, a mentorship club.

    “I love acting and I love the arts,” she said. “Dancing combines the two.”

    Anna’s love of the arts seems to run in the family. His younger brother Zach starred as “The Boy” in the Colonial Theater’s production of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” earlier this summer.

    Roth’s mother, Carmiña, an interior designer, said her daughter has had a long interest in volunteering and has always had a strong caring side.

    “She went on a mission trip to Guatemala with our church to help build a school,” Carmiña said, “and she was always involved in community service at school.

    “She is also an excellent student,” she added. “She juggles a lot.

    Anna has also been an active sailor with the Watch Hill Yacht Club for several years. She spent much of her summer working as a beach crew member for the East Beach Association.

    “I had the best summer of my life,” said Anna, who just completed her second summer working for the beach association. “I’ve already signed up for next year.”

    Stephen Iacoi, from Westerly, who led the beach team for several years, said he was not surprised when he first heard of Anna’s “efforts to support other young people girls who share the love of dance”.

    “She’s a driven young woman who isn’t afraid of a challenge,” Iacoi said in an email. “Anna has many qualities, but it’s her kindness and gentleness that appeals to everyone.

    “She is a leader, a hard worker and a friend to everyone she comes in contact with. Anna is a valued employee of the East Beach Association…we are very proud of Anna and her efforts to help the other girls in her community.”

    Senator Dennis L. Algiere, of Westerly, vice president of the Washington Trust Company and longtime friend of the Roth family, said he was also not surprised when he learned that Anna “had created this generous program”.

    “Finding a way to help other dancers in need while helping the environment is truly awesome,” he said in an email.

    Anna said she hopes word of her project will spread so she can continue to educate more and more future dancers.

    “Ideally it will go national,” she said.

    To learn more about The Leotard Project, visit https://www.theleotardproject.org/.

    nbfusaro@thewesterlysun.com

    ]]>
    Make a difference: Anna Roth develops a website to help other dancers and protect the environment | Daily news alerts https://jmwillowwinds.com/make-a-difference-anna-roth-develops-a-website-to-help-other-dancers-and-protect-the-environment-daily-news-alerts/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/make-a-difference-anna-roth-develops-a-website-to-help-other-dancers-and-protect-the-environment-daily-news-alerts/ WESTERLY – Anna Roth’s love of dance led her to enter the world of philanthropy – at the age of 17. Roth, a high school student who spends her summers at Westerly, last year founded the Leotard Project, a charity that combines all her passions: concern for the environment, a desire to help others and […]]]>

    WESTERLY – Anna Roth’s love of dance led her to enter the world of philanthropy – at the age of 17.

    Roth, a high school student who spends her summers at Westerly, last year founded the Leotard Project, a charity that combines all her passions: concern for the environment, a desire to help others and a desire to ” make a difference”. she says.

    With the stated goal of giving “new purpose to dancewear, one leotard at a time”, Project Leotard “removes economic barriers by providing dancewear to aspiring dancers in underserved communities and promotes environmental sustainability by recycling dancewear so more children can experience the joy of dancing,” Roth writes on the organization’s website.

    ‘I love dancing and I love helping people,’ a cheery Roth said one afternoon last week as she sat inside her parents’ renovated farmhouse and talked about developments. of the project and his hopes for its future.

    Roth, who has danced most of her life, said the idea for the project started when she started thinking about her used dance clothes.

    The only daughter of Carmiña and Ralf Roth, of Westerly and Old Greenwich, Connecticut, Roth said she realized dance clothes and dance shoes could be expensive, quickly outgrowing them. and often thrown away.

    “It’s an expensive sport,” she said.

    Where did all the dancewear end up, she wondered, in the landfill? And what about the dance clothes of his fellow dancers?

    And then, she says, she began to wonder if there weren’t young dancers who had been prevented from starting dancing because they couldn’t afford to buy all the leotards, shoes and pantyhose required.

    “Then I put two and two together,” she said. “And the problem kind of solved itself…or the problems solved each other.”

    Roth, a student at Loomis-Chafee School in Windsor, Connecticut, quickly began curating a collection of gently used leotards, tights, shoes and skirts and set about finding new homes for the items.

    She wrote a fundraising letter, launched a GoFundMe page and started designing the website using a template, she said.

    She also arranged for collection boxes to be placed at local dance schools and began to network in earnest. So far, she’s raised $1,875 of her $5,000 goal.

    She connected with a New Haven organization called Leadership, Education and Athletics in Partnership Inc. (LEAP), which was founded in 1992 by “educators, students and community activists to fight historic youth disengagement of color in the city.”

    “I went to New Haven and met some of the kids,” Roth said. “They were thrilled and grateful.

    “We also donated portable ballet bars and floor coverings,” she added.

    LEAP Chief of Staff Yakeita Robinson said Project Leotard donations have provided “meaningful dance experiences” for a larger group of children. Wearable bars mean the program can be offered at each of the organization’s eight locations, she said, and leotards allow interested kids to practice in real dance clothes.

    “They can actually transition from school clothes to proper dance clothes,” she said, which many kids in the program wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford.

    “It’s very exciting for us,” Robinson said, “and it’s really amazing to see someone so young making the effort to make changes.”

    Robinson said it was rare and “selfless” to see such a young woman so determined to bring about change in the lives of other young people.

    “It may seem like a small thing,” she added, “but who knows? It might spark a passion in another young girl and Anna is one of them.”

    In addition to collecting dancewear, the Leotard Project raises funds “to supplement our inventory through individual donations.”

    Roth, who said she has always been driven by her love of dancing and her eagerness to share her joy in dancing, laughed when she recalled her early days with the art form.

    “I started dancing as soon as I could walk,” she said. “It was the only thing I wanted to do. I even remember my first teacher. She was a woman named Felicity Foote at the Greenwich Ballet Workshop and she terrified me.

    “But I loved the challenge,” she added. “And I wanted to improve.”

    The passion for dancing has remained strong since those early days, said Roth, who is also a member of the varsity dance team at Loomis-Chaffee, where she is also president of the Pelican Pilots, a mentorship club.

    “I love acting and I love the arts,” she said. “Dancing combines the two.”

    Anna’s love of the arts seems to run in the family. His younger brother Zach starred as “The Boy” in the Colonial Theater’s production of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” earlier this summer.

    Roth’s mother, Carmiña, an interior designer, said her daughter has had a long interest in volunteering and has always had a strong caring side.

    “She went on a mission trip to Guatemala with our church to help build a school,” Carmiña said, “and she was always involved in community service at school.

    “She is also an excellent student,” she added. “She juggles a lot.

    Anna has also been an active sailor with the Watch Hill Yacht Club for several years. She spent much of her summer working as a beach crew member for the East Beach Association.

    “I had the best summer of my life,” said Anna, who just completed her second summer working for the beach association. “I’ve already signed up for next year.”

    Stephen Iacoi, from Westerly, who led the beach team for several years, said he was not surprised when he first heard of Anna’s “efforts to support other young people girls who share the love of dance”.

    “She’s a driven young woman who isn’t afraid of a challenge,” Iacoi said in an email. “Anna has many qualities, but it’s her kindness and gentleness that appeals to everyone.

    “She is a leader, a hard worker and a friend to everyone she comes in contact with. Anna is a valued employee of the East Beach Association…we are very proud of Anna and her efforts to help the other girls in her community.”

    Senator Dennis L. Algiere, of Westerly, vice president of the Washington Trust Company and longtime friend of the Roth family, said he was also not surprised when he learned that Anna “had created this generous program”.

    “Finding a way to help other dancers in need while helping the environment is truly awesome,” he said in an email.

    Anna said she hopes word of her project will spread so she can continue to educate more and more future dancers.

    “Ideally it will go national,” she said.

    To learn more about The Leotard Project, visit https://www.theleotardproject.org/.

    nbfusaro@thewesterlysun.com

    ]]>
    UNIDO organizes capacity building on AfCFTA Rules of Origin for SMEs https://jmwillowwinds.com/unido-organizes-capacity-building-on-afcfta-rules-of-origin-for-smes/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 13:23:38 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/unido-organizes-capacity-building-on-afcfta-rules-of-origin-for-smes/ The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) – The Ghana Component of the West Africa Competitiveness Program (WACOMP) organized a two-day training workshop for small and medium-sized enterprises on the theme “Capacity Building on AfCFTA Rules of Origin for SMEs”. 20e – 21st July 2022. The workshop attracted 83 participants from the cosmetics, cassava, fruits, […]]]>

    The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) – The Ghana Component of the West Africa Competitiveness Program (WACOMP) organized a two-day training workshop for small and medium-sized enterprises on the theme “Capacity Building on AfCFTA Rules of Origin for SMEs”. 20e – 21st July 2022.

    The workshop attracted 83 participants from the cosmetics, cassava, fruits, garments and textiles value chains.

    The objective of the training was to build the capacity of WACOMP SMEs in value chains targeted on the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) Agreement and Rules of Origin to enable them to take advantage opportunities offered by the AfCFTA.

    Describing their experiences at the workshop, all participants indicated that it was educational, interactive, informative and insightful.

    Abednego Brandy Opey, a participant said, “It was difficult to understand the AfCFTA, I hear about it in the media but it is not easy to understand, so the training helped me to really understand what the agreement aims to reach, the right countries to source raw materials and how to go about it, including taking advantage of trade in the African market”

    Abigail Amponsah Addy of Hencky Farms, another participant, also said: “I now know what form of partnership I can take advantage of within the AfCFTA and engage in business partnerships that would eventually benefit interested companies in the markets. Africans.

    Churchill Kumadey, CEO of Churchwin Trading, said: “I come from Tamale. UNIDO, EU and WACOMP have done a great job in organizing this training on the AfCFTA. It gives especially those of us who work in the manufacturing industry a very good competitive edge and a good start in understanding all the basics we need to trade with other African countries, how to go through the certification process and meet trade requirements. according to the contract.”

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    A Kitten Place, garage sale, 5K and more https://jmwillowwinds.com/a-kitten-place-garage-sale-5k-and-more/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 20:51:04 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/a-kitten-place-garage-sale-5k-and-more/ Phil Waldren presents a check for $50,000 to United Food Bank of Plant City. Compiled by Jenny Bennett A Kitten Place Rescue looking for suppliers and sponsors for a 5 km race Local Cat and Kitten Rescue A Kitten Place is hosting its annual Black Cat Halloween Run on Sunday, October 30 in Twin Lakes […]]]>
    Phil Waldren presents a check for $50,000 to United Food Bank of Plant City.

    Compiled by Jenny Bennett

    A Kitten Place Rescue looking for suppliers and sponsors for a 5 km race

    Local Cat and Kitten Rescue A Kitten Place is hosting its annual Black Cat Halloween Run on Sunday, October 30 in Twin Lakes and is seeking vendors and corporate sponsors for the event. Last year, the 5 km race had more than 175 participants.

    If you are interested and would like more information or to register for the event, please email akittenplace@gmail.com.

    Bloomingdale’s Garage Sale

    The Bloomingdale’s Neighborhood Community Garage Sale takes place on Saturday, September 12 starting at 8 a.m. This annual sale includes homes in the Bloomingdale East and West neighborhoods. A wide variety of items are usually available, including kitchen utensils, books, furniture, clothing, toys, games, and furnishings.

    Addresses will be posted on the Bloomingdale Neighborhood Association website at www.bloomingdale.life.com. To have your home listed, email bl.neighbor1@gmail.com or call 813-681-2051.

    St. Stephen’s Catholic Church Announces XLT Worship and Workshop Events

    XLT stands for ‘Exalt’ and is designed for participants to spend time in the presence of the Lord. The Blessed Sacrament, which Catholics know to be the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of the Lord, is placed in a monstrance for adoration. There is time for self-reflection, community prayer and contemporary Christian music. Along with the Blessed Sacrament expounded, XLT Praise and Worship is one of the most powerful forms of prayer outside of Holy Mass.

    XLT Praise and Worship will be held the second Friday of every month from 7-8pm at St. Stephen’s Chapel, located at 10118 St. Stephen Cir. at Riverview. For more information, visit his website at www.ststephencatholic.org.

    Strawberry Ball donates $50,000 to food bank

    The Florida Strawberry Festival presented proceeds from its annual Strawberry Ball to the United Food Bank in Plant City.

    “This year’s Strawberry Ball was a huge success,” said Phil Waldron, chairman of the Florida Strawberry Festival board of directors. “Everyone enjoyed the food, the dancing, the theme, the entertainment and of course the camaraderie.”

    The event raised a total of $50,000 for the nearby food bank.

    Cruise Planners presents a holistically harmonized event

    Cruise Planners of Valrico presents a women-only event, Holistically Harmonized Retreat. The event will take place Friday through Sunday, October 7-9, at a central Florida mansion.

    It is intended to help participants rejuvenate, rejuvenate their minds and balance their bodies. It will also help teach different self-care methods. The services included in the weekend are facials, massages, yoga classes, cooking classes and self-care classes. All food and beverages and a goody bag are also included.

    For more information, visit his website at https://cpofvalrico.square.site/holistically-harmonized.

    Your next stop is the Cure 5K run

    Your next stop is the Cure 5K race in Lithia which will take place on Saturday October 1st. You can either run the easy 5K course from Park Square in Lithia or sign up for the new virtual option, which is especially useful for encouraging family and friends who don’t live locally to sign up. All funds raised go directly to the Melanoma Research Foundation.

    Visit https://runsignup.com/race/fl/lithia/yournextstepisthecure for more information and to register for the event. If you would like to sponsor or donate to the event, please email yournextstepisthecure@aol.com.

    Free shows for Pelican players

    The Pelican Players Community Theater is proud to present two free shows on September 15th. Join them to see The Twilight Zone – To Serve Man, directed by Ron Deitsch, and Father Knows Best – The Housekeeper, directed by Leslie Stull. Doors open at 6 p.m. and curtain time is at 6:30 p.m. All are welcome.

    The Kings Point Veterans Theater North is located at 1900 Clubhouse Dr. in downtown Sun, feel free to bring your own drinks, snacks and mugs. Visit www.pelicanplayersscc.org for more information.

    Plant City Community Choir looking for singers

    The Plant City Community Choir will begin rehearsals Monday, August 15 at First United Methodist Church, located at 303 N. Evers St. in Plant City, in preparation for their fall concert.

    Rehearsals are every Monday night from 7-9:30 p.m., and he would like new members to join. It has members of all ages who sing songs of all genres, and most importantly, they have fun. If you like to sing, go see what it’s all about.

    Additional information can be found on its website at www.pccchorale.org, by emailing pccchoraleseretary@gmail.com or by calling 813-965-7213.

    Up And Away Florida donates to Flight To Honor

    Up Up and Away Florida Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization has proudly presented the Polk County Veterans Council with a donation for their upcoming Flight to Honor Mission #8. The Up Up and Away Florida Hot Air Balloon Festival held last May was a three-day event that included hot air balloons, bands, attractions and vendors.

    For more information about Up Up and Away Florida, visit their website at www.upupandawayflorida.com.

    PR Funding Center concession stand goes cashless

    The PR Fundraising Center in Lakeland has gone cashless at its concession stands. All payments at concession stands will be by credit card, debit card and mobile payment only, including Apple Pay. By going cashless, the site will help prevent losses due to human error or theft, promote security, and improve the visitor experience, as cashless transactions reduce wait times.

    Cash payments will still be accepted at the RP Funding box office for all other transactions.

    ECHO Thrift named one of the best of the best in Tampa Bay

    The ECHO Thrift store, located at 424 W. Brandon Blvd. in Brandon, received a silver award in the Best of the Best People’s Choice Awards presented by the Tampa Bay Times.

    Last year he received a bronze medal, and he couldn’t be prouder of his amazing staff and volunteers who propelled him to silver. Every dollar earned from thrift store sales goes directly back to its mission to provide immediate and long-term solutions to our neighbors in need.

    Additional information is available on its website at www.echofl.org.

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    A New Indigenous-Led Festival ʔəm̓i ce:p xʷiwəl (Come to the Fire) » Vancouver Blog Miss604 https://jmwillowwinds.com/a-new-indigenous-led-festival-%ca%94%c9%99m%cc%93i-cep-x%ca%b7iw%c9%99l-come-to-the-fire-vancouver-blog-miss604/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 17:16:26 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/a-new-indigenous-led-festival-%ca%94%c9%99m%cc%93i-cep-x%ca%b7iw%c9%99l-come-to-the-fire-vancouver-blog-miss604/ The Chan Center for the Performing Arts at UBC, in collaboration with Musqueamannounced a new festival: ʔəm̓i ce:p xʷiwəl (Come to the fire). It will be a celebration of Indigenous-led creativity, genius, culture and community. The gathering will showcase the voices of Indigenous artists, performers, musicians, speakers and dance groups from Musqueam and Indigenous Nations […]]]>

    The Chan Center for the Performing Arts at UBC, in collaboration with Musqueamannounced a new festival: ʔəm̓i ce:p xʷiwəl (Come to the fire). It will be a celebration of Indigenous-led creativity, genius, culture and community. The gathering will showcase the voices of Indigenous artists, performers, musicians, speakers and dance groups from Musqueam and Indigenous Nations of Turtle Island (North America).

    The festival’s main artwork was created by Musqueam, Vancouver-based queer xʷməθkʷəy̓əm and non-binary Tsimshian artist Chase Gray.

    ʔəm̓i ce:p xʷiwəl Come to the fire

    • When: September 17-18, 2022
    • Where: Chan Center for the Performing Arts (UBC, 6265 Crescent Rd, Vancouver)
    • Tickets: A mix of free and paid events.

    The hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ name for this event was provided by Musqueam and the elder Larry Grant with special thanks to artist Musqueam Miss Christie Lee Charles for suggesting the noun “heading for the fire”. This phrase supports a movement to bring Indigenous voices back to the fore and back to the center, fire and heart of the community, after generations of estrangement due to residential schools.

    “This festival is a great opportunity to showcase the joys of the native people,” says Pat Carrabré, director of the Chan Center for the Performing Arts and member of the Manitoba Métis Federation. “Very often, Indigenous representations are mired in tragedy. While we acknowledge the history and continued oppression of Indigenous peoples, we wanted to expand the narrative. The history of Indigenous peoples is not monolithic, nor are our cultures. With the various creatives we have invited for this festival, we highlight the incredible diversity of indigenous talent, whether through food, dance, song or other. Of course, we are particularly happy to present this festival in collaboration with Musqueam.

    Free daytime event on September 17

    The weekend will begin with free public activities on Saturday September 17. Accessible outdoor programming will include music and dance performances, Indigenous vendors, food trucks, community presentations, film screenings and cultural workshops. Hosted by a two-spirited Cree musician and drag performer Quana-styleDaytime activities will also include a dedicated memorial space for members of the Indigenous community to share a keepsake in remembrance of loved ones.

    Food vendors on Saturday September 17 include: Mr. Bannock, Bannock Busters, Na Mi Vietnamese, Rain or Shine, Upriver Bakery. Craft sellers include: Pattern Nation, Decolonial Clothing Co, Rbrth, Sisters Sage, Native by Nature, Iron Dog Books, Massy Books.

    weekend workshops

    The UBC Museum of Anthropology will host Musqueam Teachings Family Workshops on September 17 and 18. Through hands-on activities, participants can learn Musqueam place names, look at history through Musqueam timelines, and interact with Musqueam properties. This workshop is taken from the popular MOA teaching kit, developed in partnership with Musqueam: xʷməθkʷəy̓əm: qʷi:l̕qʷəl̕ ʔə kʷθə snəw̓eyəɬ ct / Musqueam: giving information about our teachings.

    The outdoor display at the Belkin Art Gallery will feature Musqueam Stories, a series of short films and videos featuring the work and words of Musqueam artists, cultural knowledge keepers and community members.

    On Saturday evening, a festival-style concert will be held inside the Chan Shun Concert Hall starting at 7:00 p.m. Self-identifying Indigenous people can attend the concert for free. Ten artists and two dance groups from across the continent will perform, and the event will be hosted by creator, actor and playwright Musqueam Quelemia Sparrow.

    Saturday evening shows

    Evening concert performers will include 2021 JUNO-nominated Solo Artist of the Year and Canadian Folk Music Award winner Julian Taylor of Mohawk and West Indian descent, an experimental Inuit duo of throat-singing sisters PIQSIQand Aboriginal businessa United States-based multinational dance troupe led by powwow dance champions, who performed during the presidential inauguration of Joe Biden.

    The concert will also feature rapper Musqueam and the City of Vancouver’s first local Indigenous Poet Laureate Miss Christie Lee performing with a Squamish and Nisga’a musician, model and actor Lady SinncereJUNO-nominated Haida pop and R&B singer Carsen Graycomposer and singer of Lil’wat Russell Wallace leading a jazz ensemble for his Tillicum Shantie project, two-spirit Afro-Indigenous DJ Orene Askew of the Squamish Nation, otherwise known as DJ O Showbrothers Sekawnee and Sekoya Baker of Squamish and Tla’amin descent, Musqueam R&B singer Noah Crawford who will be making their debut, and a family group of three generations of Coast Salish singers, drummers and dancers, Tsatsu Stalqayualso known as Coastal Wolf Pack.

    in additionʔəm̓i ce:p xʷiwəl (Come to the fire) will premiere a new musical composition co-created by master weaver Musqueam Debra Sparrow in partnership with a musician from Vancouver Ruby Sing, and a string ensemble from Vancouver. The work will mix musical elements taken directly from Sparrow’s work Reconciliation cover design and musically shape a cross-cultural expression of Musqueam and non-Indigenous collaboration. Other Sparrow blankets and weaves will be on display at the Chan Center throughout the weekend.

    The evening concert will be taped and broadcast on CBC Music, CBC Radio One and CBC Gem on September 30 for Orange Shirt Day and the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

    Buffy Sainte Marie

    On Sunday, September 18, the festival will conclude with a concert by the legendary Oscar-winning Cree artist and musician Buffy Sainte Marie. Buffy Sainte-Marie has spent her life creating, innovating and disrupting. After five decades of an award-winning career, the prolific Cree singer-songwriter has been a music pioneer, environmental activist, tireless advocate for marginalized peoples, prolific musician, actress and feminist icon. Discounted tickets for Indigenous Peoples are available. The Museum of Anthropology and the Belkin Art Gallery will also repeat their offers of free workshops and outdoor film screenings from the day before.

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    Singapore Tourism Highlights Local Brands by Reopening Doors to Tourists: Part Two https://jmwillowwinds.com/singapore-tourism-highlights-local-brands-by-reopening-doors-to-tourists-part-two/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 11:22:44 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/singapore-tourism-highlights-local-brands-by-reopening-doors-to-tourists-part-two/ SINGAPORE has many local brands that are worth looking into, as Singaporeans are known to bring their mark of excellence and perfectionism in everything they do. One such brand is Awfully Chocolate, a boutique that started with a single product and has since evolved into several cafes and restaurants that all showcase dark chocolate. Its […]]]>

    SINGAPORE has many local brands that are worth looking into, as Singaporeans are known to bring their mark of excellence and perfectionism in everything they do.

    One such brand is Awfully Chocolate, a boutique that started with a single product and has since evolved into several cafes and restaurants that all showcase dark chocolate. Its finest melt-in-your-mouth dark chocolate truffles are made from the finest 70% Belgian dark chocolate. We tried the chocolate chip cookies and they were also very good.

    The Coconut Club is known for its Nasi Lemak and other coconut dishes. Seared Akaroa Salmon at Open Farm Community in Dempsey Hill

    One of the most interesting places we visited was the Intan Peranakan Heritage Museum, a designated heritage house owned by Alvin Yapp who filled it with Peranakan artifacts and antiquities. From the outside, the house looks like a typical two-story house in an affluent neighborhood, but the spacious interior houses Yapp’s extensive collection of intricate wooden furniture, jars, Tiffin holders, beaded slippers, china Chinese Peranakan, Nyonya batik sarong and many other priceless items.

    There are so many things to see in the museum. Let me tell you, even the toilets are Instagram worthy and Yap is such an engaging storyteller. He has a story for every object in his house. For example, the jars that line the staircase were used as spittoons and chamber pots at the time.

    Due to Covid-19 restrictions, visits to Intan must be scheduled in advance. The museum can comfortably accommodate up to 40 people and the venue can be booked for special events, such as engagements, dinners, birthdays and even small weddings.

    Dinner that night was at Potato Head located inside a heritage building in Chinatown. The place has several restaurants but we went to the rooftop bar where we had burgers and fries.

    Design Orchard on Orchard Road showcases local fashion, beauty and accessories brands

    For after dinner drinks we went to Native Bar on Amoy Street where we had some interesting cocktails and soft drinks. The theme here is foraging, so we had lots of fermented drinks with local ingredients. We were seated in the loft, which is a cool place to relax.

    On the third day of our trip, we did the famous Sidecar Tour of Kampong Glam. You’ll enjoy the 1-hour sidecar tour of a vintage Singapore Sidecars Vespa. They will provide the helmet and a protective plastic for your head. Kampong Glam was once the seat of Malay royalty and best known for its two main landmarks: the Sultan Mosque, the oldest and largest mosque in Singapore, and the Istana Kampong Gelam, the former Sultan’s Palace (now known as the Malay Heritage Centre). This is quite an expensive tour at around 7,000 pesos upwards, but worth every peso if money is not an issue. It’s an experience you can only find in Singapore. This is a tour that will allow you to see Singapore from a totally different perspective.

    Next stop was the Vintage Cameras Museum, which is shaped like a camera and displays around 1,000 cameras (most vintage). These include spy cameras, walking stick camera, pigeon cameras, 3D camera and gun cameras. The short tour is quite interesting, especially if you like photography.

    Lunch was at the Coconut Club on Arab Street, where we all had the Nasi Lemak, a dish of fried chicken and rice cooked in coconut milk and served with a sunny egg, peanuts, spicy fried anchovies and sambal ( chilli sauce). I’m not usually a fan of this dish but the Coconut Club version is really really good and the portion is generous so no one in the party can finish their food. This is a restaurant I would definitely return to. The restaurant also has lovely, airy interiors, and there’s an alfresco space outside if you don’t mind the heat.

    We took a quick trip to SIFR Aromatics for the Perfume Discovery Workshop. The store specializes in custom fragrance blends, small batch fragrances, soy wax scented candles, natural essential oil blends, and home fragrances. The workshop gives you the opportunity to create your own perfume by learning the different notes. As a perfume enthusiast, I love this concept. I saw another perfume around the corner, so if that’s your thing, you know where to go.

    The next day we went to the new Museum of Ice Cream on Dempsey Hill. If you have small children, they will definitely love this. There are lots of free ice creams in the different rooms. My friend told me the best time to go is at night when there are lights outside so I’ll keep that in mind.

    We had an unforgettable lunch at Open Farm Community in Dempsey Hill, which has an open kitchen concept and is pet friendly. Everything they served us was exquisite. The restaurant also grows its own vegetables and I believe the menu changes depending on what is in season and what is available. They also suggest wine pairings for the dishes. For my main, I had the Akaroa Curry Pan-Seared Salmon, which was really good, but what I enjoyed the most were the cauliflower wings, which tasted like Korean chicken. It was a starter meant to be shared but I finished a bowl on my own. It was so good.

    Our next stop before dinner was Design Orchard, a local brand storefront on Orchard Road. The place is vast and home to different brands offering fashion, skincare, jewelry, and even perfume. I wish I had more time to explore (Design Orchard is across 313@Somerset) as so many brands are definitely worth talking about. There were clothes from designer Sabrina Goh and handbags from Cocoonese. What I really loved were the local brand fragrances. I wish I had taken notes because some of the perfumes I tasted smelled really good.

    Dinner was at the Chatterbox at the Hilton Singapore Orchard. I will never forget Chatterbox as it was where I had my first meal on my very first visit to Singapore decades ago. Their specialty is, of course, chicken rice and I know you can get great chicken rice in many other places, but to me this is the best for sentimental reasons. Chatterbox, by the way, is a 51-year-old restaurant.

    On our last day we did a tour of Chinatown and had some free time. I will soon share my beauty and gourmet finds in my column. If you want to know what Singapore requires for entry, I’ve written about it before here (bit.ly/3pq8mmL).

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