Clothing Workshop – JM Willow Winds http://jmwillowwinds.com/ Sun, 15 May 2022 21:55:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jmwillowwinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Clothing Workshop – JM Willow Winds http://jmwillowwinds.com/ 32 32 Salem Library Hosts Weekly Spring Events | News https://jmwillowwinds.com/salem-library-hosts-weekly-spring-events-news/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:05:00 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/salem-library-hosts-weekly-spring-events-news/ SALEM — The Salem Public Library will continue its weekly spring programs through June 10. Unless otherwise stated, all programs will be in person at the Library, 370 Essex St., Salem. Please register online at: salempl.org/calendar or by calling 978-744-9667. Tuesdays : 9:30 a.m., sensory bins with Mrs. Mary — for children 18 months to […]]]>

SALEM — The Salem Public Library will continue its weekly spring programs through June 10. Unless otherwise stated, all programs will be in person at the Library, 370 Essex St., Salem. Please register online at: salempl.org/calendar or by calling 978-744-9667.

Tuesdays : 9:30 a.m., sensory bins with Mrs. Mary — for children 18 months to 3 years old with adult guardian(s). The tubs can hold water, whipped cream, and other food items, so be prepared to get a little dirty.

Tuesdays : 3:45 Crafternoon Embroidery with Mrs. Kate— for ages 8 and up. Basics of hand embroidery to create unique crafts including pillows, clothes, buttons. Beginners are welcome. All supplies provided.

Wednesdays : 9:30 a.m. Babies and Books with Mrs. Jen — children 0-18 months join in for interactive story time. A special chance to bond with your baby. A librarian shares books, songs, wraps, games and activities, introduces basic baby signs through nursery rhymes, stories and songs.

Wednesdays:10:30 a.m. Babies and Books with Mrs. Jessica — for children 0-18 months. Interactive story play time and chance to bond with your baby. A special chance to bond with your baby. A librarian shares books, songs, wraps, games and activities, introduces basic baby signs through nursery rhymes, stories and songs.

Wednesdays : 6:30 p.m. Writing workshop for ages 10 and up — join poet and educator Katie Naoum Rogers in a six-week exploration for young writers. Short and in-depth writing exercises, reading, discussion, original works of fiction and poetry.

Thursdays : 9:30 a.m. Story time with Miss Simone— for ages 18 months to 5 years old; a weekly story hour with stories, songs and activities.

Thursdays : 10:30 a.m. Story time with Mrs. Suzie — for ages 18 months to 5 years old; a weekly story hour with stories, songs and activities.

Fridays:3:30 p.m. Children’s Knitting Circle with Mrs. Jen — intermediate knitters ages 8 and up bring their knitting projects, develop their skills, and support other knitters.

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Austin Artist Chaka Mahone Lands a Spot in Macy’s Competitive Incubator https://jmwillowwinds.com/austin-artist-chaka-mahone-lands-a-spot-in-macys-competitive-incubator/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:04:18 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/austin-artist-chaka-mahone-lands-a-spot-in-macys-competitive-incubator/ Best known around town as one half of hip-hop duo Riders Against the Storm, rapper Chaka Mahone is also an accomplished visual artist. He launched his NefrFreshr clothing line in 2017 with a dynamic art and fashion show in Antone’s gallery. He now hopes a new Macy’s-sponsored brand development opportunity could bring the line to […]]]>

Best known around town as one half of hip-hop duo Riders Against the Storm, rapper Chaka Mahone is also an accomplished visual artist. He launched his NefrFreshr clothing line in 2017 with a dynamic art and fashion show in Antone’s gallery. He now hopes a new Macy’s-sponsored brand development opportunity could bring the line to a wider audience.

Out of 600 applicants, NefrFreshr was one of six companies accepted into the department store workshop at Macy’s incubator program. Over a six-week period, Mahone will take part in an intensive program that includes lessons on everything from brand identity and marketing to how to build relationships with investors and retailers. The final classes will be held at Macy’s New York headquarters in late May.

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Message from the CEO: Moving Business Forward – Boca Raton’s Most Trusted Source of Information https://jmwillowwinds.com/message-from-the-ceo-moving-business-forward-boca-ratons-most-trusted-source-of-information/ Tue, 10 May 2022 15:41:48 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/message-from-the-ceo-moving-business-forward-boca-ratons-most-trusted-source-of-information/ Last Friday, Governor DeSantis officially signed the largest tax relief package in Florida state history. The $1.2 billion plan is designed to relieve Floridians from the highest level of inflation in 40 years. In addition, children’s diapers, as well as clothing and footwear, for children five and under will be zero-rated for an entire year […]]]>

Last Friday, Governor DeSantis officially signed the largest tax relief package in Florida state history. The $1.2 billion plan is designed to relieve Floridians from the highest level of inflation in 40 years. In addition, children’s diapers, as well as clothing and footwear, for children five and under will be zero-rated for an entire year from July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2023. Children’s books will also be zero-rated for three months. from May 14 to August 14.

Several other sales tax holidays have been announced by the Governor, including a 14-day back-to-school sales tax holiday (July 25 to August 7), a 14-day disaster preparedness sales tax holiday (May 28 to June 10), a Freedom Week Sales Tax (July 1-7), and the first-ever Skilled Worker Tools Tax Holiday (September 3-9). For a more complete list of items included in the sales tax holiday and upcoming tax relief, click here.

Governor DeSantis also signed Florida Senate Bill 434, reauthorizing VISIT FLORIDA and extending the sunset date by five years, to October 1, 2028. This is VISIT FLORIDA’s fourth expansion and will continue to support their great work and strengthen our tourism economy for years to come.

In other exciting news for VISIT FLORIDA, VISIT FLORIDA seeks nominations for its annual Flagler Awards. The Flagler Awards are an annual statewide competition recognizing outstanding Florida tourism marketing. The program was created by VISIT FLORIDA to honor the countless individuals and organizations that help position Florida as the world’s premier travel destination. Each year, the Flagler Awards honor the determined efforts of those who use their skills, ingenuity, creativity and innovative spirit to market Florida to the world. Any Florida-based business, organization, or individual actively promoting the diverse products and experiences that Florida’s tourism industry can participate in the Flagler Awards. You do not need to be a VISIT FLORIDA partner to participate. Applications must be submitted by noon on Friday, May 27, 2022. For more information on requirements and how to submit, click here.

The town of Boynton Beach will host the Turn the Tables Career and Internship Fair this Wednesday at the Boynton Beach Arts and Cultural Center. Students aged 15 and over are encouraged to participate, inquire and apply for internships (paid and unpaid) in a variety of fields. Students are encouraged to pre-register, but walk-ins are also welcome. Students should bring a copy of their resume. If you are an employer interested in participating, click here to register.

Habitat for Humanity, ADT, City of Boynton Beach and Boynton Beach Community Redevelopment Agency (ARC) welcomed a new owner to the city. Thanks to its partnership with ADT, the house received the latest home security systems and solar panels on the roof. ADT’s corporate headquarters, located in Boca Raton, is committed to strengthening the communities in which its employees live and work. We are grateful for their contribution to making our region a better and safer place.

Looking for a quick way to find an event, register for an event, and receive pop-up notifications of important Chamber, County, City of Boca Raton, and City of Boynton Beach information? Download the Boca Chamber app – found on the App Store and Google Play Store. Keep your Room close at hand! You can also keep up to date with all Chamber activities by visiting us at bocachamber.com.

Below is a list of our upcoming in person and virtual experiences:

5/11 – 11:45 a.m. Lunch and in-person learning at Boynton Beach

For more information and to register, click here

5/12 – 11:30 a.m. Virtual Boca Government Affairs Committee

For more information and to register, click here

05/17 – 8:30 a.m. Boca Master Class workshop in person

For more information and to register, click here

17/05 – 11:45 a.m. Pulse lunch in person

For more information and to register, click here

05/17 – 11:45 a.m. In person Economic Development Committee

For more information and to register, click here

05/19 – 8:30 a.m. Southern In-Person Healthcare Advocacy Network (SHAN)

For more information and to register, click here

19/05 – 8:00 a.m. In person at Boynton Beach: Café Plus

For more information and to register, click here

Now in its 45th year, Boca Chamber Festival Days is the Chamber’s commitment to supporting the nonprofit community. Non-Profit Chamber Members are partnering with For-Profit Chamber Members to organize fundraising events during the month of August! The goal is to raise awareness and raise much-needed funds for nonprofit members to advance their important missions. Nonprofit members benefit from extensive exposure and marketing, including inclusion in the Chamber’s Events Calendar, Community Calendar, multiple social media outlets, and a print calendar distributed throughout the community. For more information about your company’s participation in Boca Chamber Festival Days, contact Alison Miuccio, Membership Development Manager. The deadline to participate is June 6, 2022.

Together, we continue to drive business forward in Boca Raton, Boynton Beach and South Palm Beach County, making our region the best place to live, work, learn and play.

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May 9 Community Calendar | Community News https://jmwillowwinds.com/may-9-community-calendar-community-news/ Mon, 09 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/may-9-community-calendar-community-news/ Join the Healthy Adams County Fitness Task Force for a walking party on Wednesday, May 11 at the Gettysburg Day Spa, 730 Chambersburg Road. Stroll the old golf cart path, admire the ponds and nature, part of the Gettysburg National Military Park. Treasure hunt for all ages. The walk is two miles, a few hiking […]]]>

Join the Healthy Adams County Fitness Task Force for a walking party on Wednesday, May 11 at the Gettysburg Day Spa, 730 Chambersburg Road. Stroll the old golf cart path, admire the ponds and nature, part of the Gettysburg National Military Park. Treasure hunt for all ages. The walk is two miles, a few hiking trails, mostly flat and paved, from 1 to 6 p.m. The walks are free and open to everyone, rain or shine, except in bad weather. Dogs on leash accepted. Email your questions to jgastley2@wellspan.org or visit facebook.com/healthyadamscounty.

Gettysburg United Methodist Church, 30 W. High St., hosts Lynn Deardoff, dementia/Alzheimer’s specialist from the Adams County Office of Aging, for a free workshop Thursday, May 19, from 1 p.m. 30 to 3:30 p.m., at Gettysburg UMC. Deardoff will talk about early detection and how to relate to, live with, and support people who show signs of this disease. Call the church at 717-334-3032 for more information.

Amberson, a gospel group from Pennsylvania with musical influences toward classic country, will perform in person on Sunday, May 15 at 10 a.m. at the Heidlersburg Church of the United Brethren in Christ, 2736 Heidlersburg Road. There is no admission charge, but a freewill offering will be received. After the concert there will be a covered lunch, bring a dish to share and your own cutlery.

Anyone who enjoys knitting/crocheting as a hobby or wants to learn how to knit is invited to join a group at Memorial Baptist Church, 1096 Biglerville Road, Gettysburg, the first and third Thursdays of each month from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. is free for camaraderie, fun and knitting. Call Marybeth at 484-505-0470 for more information.

The Gettysburg Hospital Auxiliary Thrift Store, 10 Lincoln Square, will carry prom dresses priced at $10 to $40 through May 17. Wedding dresses are also available. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday.

The local chapter of RU Recovery Ministries meets at 7 p.m. every Friday at Lighthouse Baptist Church, 80 Apple Ave., Gettysburg. RU is a faith-based addiction recovery program. Whether you or someone you know is having difficulty, you are welcome. There are no fees, commitments or prerequisites to attend. There is daycare and children’s programs run by licensed staff. For more information, go to lighthousebaptistgettysburg.org or call Jeremy at 717-745-7375.

Al Anon meets Tuesdays at noon at the Gettysburg Presbyterian Church, 208 Baltimore St. The 12-step program is for friends and family concerned about the alcohol problems of others. Everyone is welcome. Parking behind the church. Enter through the side door under the portico, go straight to the stairs or the elevator. At the top of the stairs, go through the door on the right to a large room with several tables.

Just for Today Al-Anon Family Group offers support to those affected by someone else’s drinking. Meetings are held Mondays, 7-8 p.m., in the Music Room of St. James Lutheran Church, 109 York Street, Gettysburg. Park on the church grounds or on the street. Enter through the Stratton Street entrance. Follow the sign to the bedroom. Mandatory masks. www.pa.al-anon.org.

The Adams County Farmer’s Market, 108 N. Stratton St., Gettysburg, is open Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. through October with free parking accessible from North Stratton Street.

A Blossom Festival is scheduled for May 14, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the National Apple Museum, Biglerville, sponsored by the Biglerville Historical and Preservation Society, with 36 vendors, food trucks, face painting, a book signing, the Pa. Apple Queen, music by the Derr family and the Gettysburg Generation Big Band, orchard tours on horseback and wagon, tours of the Apple Museum and gift shop. Family event. Free parking and entry.

The girlfriends (formerly Red Hat group) will meet at the Elkhorn on Tuesday, May 17 at 5:30 p.m. Judy’s program.

Biglerville seniors will meet on Wednesday, May 11 at 12:30 p.m. at the Hunterstown Diner. New members are always welcome.

Benders Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1385 Rentzel Road, will be hosting a garage sale on Saturday, June 11, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Retail spaces are available. Call Josie at 717-677-8297 for more information or to reserve a spot.

The Biglerville Community Yard Sale is June 4, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., with the Farm Show Milkshake Truck and Taco Trailer Food Truck at 99 N. Main St., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Maps and info 98 N. Main St. Text 717-262-8960 with address if attending. People outside the borough can set up at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church by calling 717-677-6365 ahead of time.

The Fairfield Group of Alcoholics Anonymous meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. at 201 W. Main St. This is a closed meeting.

The Gettysburg High School Class of 1953 will meet for lunch on Thursday, May 12 at 11:30 a.m. at the Gettysburg Family Restaurant, York Road.

New members are invited to join a group of Mah Jongg players who meet Mondays at 11:30 a.m. at the YWCA on Fairfield Road.

The Gettysburg Woman’s Club will hold its May meeting at Hoss’s on Wednesday, May 11 at 11:30 a.m. New members and guests welcome. Call Suzanne @ 717-677-8362 for reservations.

The Gettysburg United Methodist Church clothing closet, 30 W. High St., is open and stocked with spring and summer clothing starting at 0.25 cents. Open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. See Judy or Cory to volunteer.

The Gettysburg High School Class of 1949 will meet for lunch on Wednesday, May 11 at Hoss’s house at noon.

Gettysburg High School, Class of 1961, will meet for dinner May 10 at 6 p.m. at the Hunterstown Diner.

The Gettysburg Walking Club will meet in Greist Park, York Springs on Tuesday, May 10 at 10 a.m. to walk the area. For more information, call 717-339-9389. All welcome.

The monthly turkey dinner with dessert, $10, take-out only, will be held Sunday, May 15 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Immaculate Conception Parish Center, behind the church, 106 Carlisle St., with handicapped entrance at 101 , N. Peters St. This will be the last dinner until September. The Thrift Shop will be open during dinner with everything half price.

The second annual Plant Sale at the Blue Ridge Summit Free Library plaza takes place on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. There will be native plants, perennials, flowering annuals, herbs, heirloom vegetables, hanging baskets and Mother’s Day planter mixes. Due to the rainy forecast, it will be under tents.

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Meet the new collectors of old books https://jmwillowwinds.com/meet-the-new-collectors-of-old-books/ Sat, 07 May 2022 09:00:23 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/meet-the-new-collectors-of-old-books/ Late last month, at the New York International Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory, Rebecca Romney removed a copy of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl, Kaddish, and Other Poems” from the window of her booth. She didn’t do it to recite from her pages but to show the writing in the margins. Amy Winehouse had […]]]>

Late last month, at the New York International Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory, Rebecca Romney removed a copy of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl, Kaddish, and Other Poems” from the window of her booth. She didn’t do it to recite from her pages but to show the writing in the margins.

Amy Winehouse had stumped the lyrics of an unrecorded song alongside Ginsberg’s lines. “You see his artistic process,” Ms. Romney said. “And it’s right next to someone else’s art that she was consuming while creating something new.” Ginsberg’s text is the centerpiece of Ms. Winehouse’s 220-book collection, which Ms. Romney’s company, Type Punch Matrix, near Washington, DC, is in talks to sell as a unit for $135,000. “It shows a life lived through the books,” she said.

Ms. Romney is an established saleswoman known to “Pawn Stars” fans as the show’s rare book expert. But at 37, she represents a large and growing cohort of young collectors who come to the trade from many walks of life; Just opposite, Luke Pascal, a 30-year-old former restaurateur, presided over a crate of letters from Abraham Lincoln and George Washington.

Michael F. Suarez, director of the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, said these days his students are younger and less masculine than a decade ago, with nearly a third of between them benefiting from full scholarships.

“The archival world is actually considered quite hip,” he said.

Of course, most first-time collectors can’t shell out hundreds of thousands of dollars for a first edition. But by frequenting estate sales and second-hand bookstores, scouring eBay for hidden gems, and learning to spot the value of all manner of items, enthusiasts in their 20s and 30s have amassed collections that reflect their own tastes and interests.

Their work has been honored with awards from organizations and vendors such as Honey & Wax in Brooklyn, which reward efforts to create “the most ingenious, thoughtful, or original collections”, as opposed to the most valuable, said Professor Suarez. As a result, they help shape the next generation of a rarefied hobby and trade.

Several young participants stood out among the crowd of business clothes and books at the fair – especially Laura Jaeger, a petite 22-year-old with a mop of pink hair. His mother, Jennifer Jaeger, owns Ankh Antiquarian Books in Chadstone, Australia, specializing in books on ancient Egypt; Laura is in the process of becoming a partner in the firm.

She plans to expand her collection to reflect her interests, she said, such as metaphysics and photography. “But I still really know my rare Greek, Roman, Egyptian books, really well,” she said. “I’ve been able to rate books for a few years now.”

Kendall Spencer, 30, also hopes to leave his mark on the world of antiquarian books. A Georgetown law graduate who fell in love with rare books while researching Frederick Douglass, he apprenticed at DeWolfe & Wood Rare Books while preparing to take the Massachusetts bar exam.

“If you walk around here, there’s no one behind a booth that looks like me,” said Mr Spencer, who is black.

The Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, a trade group with more than 450 members, hopes to see this change. The group launched a diversity initiative in 2020 to “encourage and promote the participation of LGBTQ+, BIPOC and underrepresented groups in the world of book collecting and trade,” wrote Susan Benne, executive director of the organization, in an e-mail. The group has also introduced a paid internship program placing participants in member companies.

“I want to see more people like me take an interest,” Mr. Spencer said, “and I think that starts with someone inviting people in.”

When starting out, most collectors focus on second-hand and vintage books that matter for personal reasons, sourced from thrift stores, second-hand bookstores and other amateur enthusiasts.

Thomas Gebremedhin, 34, vice president and editor-in-chief of Doubleday, started buying paperbacks at thrift stores in his early 20s while enrolled in the Iowa Writers Workshop, in order to read authors out of color, such as Gayl Jones. . These days, he can afford much more expensive rare books, though he also picks up first-edition hardcovers for less than $10 from a “secret” bookstore in Brooklyn.

“You can find first editions anywhere,” said Gebremedhin, whose collection includes thousands of titles. “They should have a TLC show. You know this coupon issue? I think there should be an equivalent for book buyers.

Camille Brown, 30, started collecting books at age 23 and worked at the Letterform Archive in San Francisco. “I started posting on Instagram the things I was scanning, which then led to posting on my own personal collection,” she said, which includes books on woodworking and carpentry. (His father is an entrepreneur.) Soon people started asking him for sourcing advice.

“It showed me there was more interest in the market than I thought,” Ms Brown said. Today, she’s a hobby bookseller on the platform and curates vintage books for clothing boutiques, sourcing most of her material from libraries and estate sales.

Ms Romney began collecting rare books at age 23, when she was hired by Bauman Rare Books in Las Vegas – a job she assumed her bachelor’s degree in classical studies and linguistics would not qualify her for. But she discovered that “general bookishness” was the only real prerequisite; anyone fairly nerdy, curious and thrifty could get into it.

She said collecting can be “an exercise in autobiography” — a way of seeing facets of one’s own experience refracted through the mirror of another’s life. For example: Margaret Landis, 30, is an astrophysicist who collects texts related to the cometary discoveries of Maria Mitchell, the first female astronomer in the United States. And Caitlin Gooch, the founder of a nonprofit literacy organization in North Carolina, collects non-fiction works related to black riders.

Ms Gooch’s father and uncle had documented the family’s “cowboy history”, she said, before her uncle died and the collection was lost. “We don’t know where these photos and videos are,” she said, “so for me to find these books, even if they’re not directly about my history, means that I will be able to share information from them.

Beyond the connection they offer to the past, collectors feel drawn to titles and editions that look good. This is why, as Jess Kuronen said, the jacket of a book plays a considerable role in the price.

Ms Kuronen, 29, owns Left Bank Books in Manhattan, which caters to what she calls “entry-level” collectors. In his store, a first edition of “On the Road” without the dust jacket is priced at $500. A “quasi-thin” first edition with the jacket recently selling for nearly $7,000.

At the Rare Book School, Professor Suarez said, students “learn to read graphic codes, illustrations and social codes” to understand “the life of this book over time in various communities”.

“There are definitely people who strictly want to buy used books rather than newer ones,” said Addison Richley, 28, owner of Des Pair Books in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Once she’s finished a book she likes, she scours the internet for “a prettier copy or a more interesting edit.” Recently, a customer refused to purchase a new copy of a vintage book he saw on the store’s Instagram.

“They explained to me that a used book is more special because it has character,” Ms. Richley said.

Brynn Whitfield, a 36-year-old technology publicist, started collecting old chess books five years ago. “I’m getting more and more compliments for having these items in my house,” she said. “People think it’s cooler than typical coffee table books.”

Although second-hand book sales are thriving online, most sellers believe there’s a serendipity that only in-person browsing can provide.

“So many things these days are trying to sell you what the machine thinks you already want,” said Josiah Wolfson, the 34-year-old owner of Aeon Bookstore, an underground boutique in Lower Manhattan. “I don’t want to presuppose what everyone is looking for, even if they collect a specific thing.”

Sometimes the book that jumps out is not at all what a collector would have expected to acquire. But, as Mr. Gebremedhin said, the “emotional logic” of a vintage cover eventually speaks to the collector.

“I just got a first edition of ‘Naked and the Dead’,” he said. He is not a fan of Norman Mailer, its author. But: “That’s a nice cover.”

The market for used and rare books is a circular system of materials and ideas, and many young collectors, including Mr. Wolfson, see their shelves as “fluid.” He frequently selects his personal collection of titles with spiritual influences for Aeon stock, a process he likens to divination. If a book no longer matters to him, he said, “someone else should really enjoy it.”

Mr. Gebremedhin plans to donate his collection to the Columbus Public Library in Ohio, where he grew up. He donated 500 pounds before moving to a new apartment in Brooklyn. “A lot of the books that come into my house end up finding someone else,” he said. “That’s kind of the beauty of reading them and sharing them.”

Ms Brown, who sells books via Instagram, said “accessibility” is a guiding impulse in her work. The internet, she says, “opens the door for these objects to live far more lives than they otherwise would have lived.”

Back at the fair, Jesse Paris Smith, 34, and his mother, singer-songwriter Patti Smith, were looking at a book written by Charlotte Brontë when she was 13. For both of them, looking at the texts and the covers has been a source of bonding. (Patti started collecting books around age 9, when she bought “A Child’s Garden of Verses” at a church bazaar for 50 cents; today it’s worth $5,000.)

“Jesse made books and I sold them,” Patti said. “I took inventory, I wrapped them, wrapped them in gifts, I charged them.”

The Smiths also regularly donate books. “It’s painful, but we try to bring the ones we don’t read back into the world,” Jesse said.

“But not our special books!” Patti said.

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Hands-on Hawaiian kapa making for the SOEST community https://jmwillowwinds.com/hands-on-hawaiian-kapa-making-for-the-soest-community/ Thu, 05 May 2022 20:36:50 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/hands-on-hawaiian-kapa-making-for-the-soest-community/ Tools used to make kapa. To learn about the traditional art of barkcloth making from world famous kapa maker Dalani Tanahy, nearly 30 novices from the University of Hawaii at the Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) joined the event. With funding from the uh Mānoa Office of Student Equity, Excellence […]]]>
Tools used to make kapa.

To learn about the traditional art of barkcloth making from world famous kapa maker Dalani Tanahy, nearly 30 novices from the University of Hawaii at the Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) joined the event. With funding from the uh Mānoa Office of Student Equity, Excellence & Diversity and the SOEST Maile Mentoring Bridge Program, the workshop was open to faculty, staff and students.

woman sitting on blanket on grass
Honor Booth pounding paper mulberry bark to make Kapa.

Kapa is a traditional fabric created from the bast fibers of trees and shrubs of Rosales and Malvales flowering plants and is mainly used for clothing, bedding, dresses and also as banners and funeral wraps. This craft involves removing the outer bark of branches, hammering the fiber into cloth, and designing and decorating the materials with symbolic prints.

Practicing the art of Hawaiian kapa for nearly 25 years, Tanahy has created pieces for notable figures, including the Dalai Lama and the King of Morocco, among others. His work has been featured in exhibitions at the Bishop Museum, the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC, and the British Museum.

During the workshop, Tanahy and his apprentice Kehau, shared the prevalence of kapa throughout Polynesia and the revival of the practice in Hawaii as well as tools used and examples of kapa from various Pacific Island communities. With warm encouragement from the kumu, participants were given the opportunity to create their own kapa from a small piece of a paper mulberry branch.

tools in the grass
Paper mulberry bark with tools used for making kapa.

Tanahy and Kehau’s passion for craftsmanship and generosity in sharing traditional art shines through every step of the workshop. Attendees were amazed and delighted to witness the transformation of a small, rigid section of bark into a larger, flexible, fabric-like material.

“Dalani and Kehau were excellent teachers, open to all of our questions, and shared the fascinating history and diversity of Pacific Island kapa,” said Noah Howins, graduate student in oceanography and event organizer. “I hope kapa’s workshop was just the first of many culture-focused workshops in SOEST in 2022. Based on participant feedback, there is a strong desire for more cross-cutting events that bring cultural practitioners together to share their knowledge.

This event is an example of uh Mānoa’s goal of becoming a place of Native Hawaiian learning (PDF), one of the four objectives defined in the Strategic Plan 2015-2025 (PDF), updated December 2020.

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Celebrate Small Business Resilience – Black Girl Nerds https://jmwillowwinds.com/celebrate-small-business-resilience-black-girl-nerds/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:38:51 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/celebrate-small-business-resilience-black-girl-nerds/ National Small Business Week is celebrated the first week of May each year. This year’s theme, “Building a Better America Through Entrepreneurship,” celebrates the resilience and tenacity of American entrepreneurs who are doing their part to propel our country’s economic comeback. For generations, small businesses across America have shaped the entrepreneurial spirit. Today, more than […]]]>

National Small Business Week is celebrated the first week of May each year. This year’s theme, “Building a Better America Through Entrepreneurship,” celebrates the resilience and tenacity of American entrepreneurs who are doing their part to propel our country’s economic comeback.

For generations, small businesses across America have shaped the entrepreneurial spirit. Today, more than 32 million small businesses employ half of America’s workforce. They are also the heart and soul of many communities.

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is honoring small businesses with a series of events this year, including a live virtual summit, educational sessions and awards shows. The virtual summit will highlight SBA partners’ involvement in entrepreneurial development, disaster recovery, government contracts, financial development, and overall small business support. It will also focus on access to essential federal resources, educational workshops and networking to help entrepreneurs pivot and grow in the face of current and future challenges.

Women-owned businesses continue to grow; however, women still face more hurdles than men when starting and growing their businesses. These challenges – primarily obtaining small business loans – hinder the success of women-owned businesses and their ability to create jobs and grow.

Black female entrepreneurs are also on the rise. JP Morgan noted in 2021 that “Black women are the fastest growing demographic of entrepreneurs in the United States,” representing nearly 2.7 million businesses nationwide. Yet the disparity between white and black-owned businesses proves that the economy has not been in favor of black-owned businesses. They brought in just $422 billion in revenue compared to white women-owned businesses, which brought in $1.4 trillion in revenue.

During Black History Month, the SBA reaffirmed its commitment to creating equity-increasing funding opportunities for small business owners, especially businesses owned by Black women. The Biden administration and the SBA are making black women-owned businesses a priority. SBA Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman announced the availability of $1.5 million for 10 new grant opportunities.

The State of Women-Owned Businesses report also indicates that four million new jobs and $981 billion in revenue would be added if the average revenue of minority women-owned businesses matched that of women-owned businesses. white women. Additionally, Black women-owned businesses were found to earn an average revenue of $24,000 compared to $142,900 among all women-owned businesses. The gap between the average income of Black women-owned businesses and all women-owned businesses is the largest of any minority.

The pandemic has had an impact on the economy and, unfortunately, small businesses have been the hardest hit. They were forced to limit hours, services, and many had to close their doors permanently. Despite the setbacks, black women business owners have held on. Isha Joseph owns Make Manifest, a clothing and jewelry boutique in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, which functions as a workshop space for the community. In the early days of the pandemic, Joseph recalls: “It was like a ghost town. It was more like desperation. Just people who feel very uncertain. Not knowing what’s going on, not knowing what’s going on. »

The pandemic has also inspired many black women to start their own businesses, often out of necessity. A friend of mine was fired from her job at the company just as the pandemic hit. With two children, a mortgage and bills, she chose to start an online business to continue generating income and for more flexibility once her children had to be homeschooled. Now it’s a viable business that has gone far beyond what it could have imagined.

As the pandemic wanes, the number of black-owned businesses in the United States is currently about 30% higher than pre-pandemic levels. This growth was forged by black entrepreneurs like Joseph and other black women business owners.

Continuing to support small businesses, especially Black-owned businesses, is essential for the growth of the American economy. These owners need better access to capital and legislation that makes it easier to start, grow and manage their business.

I believe one way we can help close the gap is to start first. I believe one way we can help close the gap is to educate ourselves about anti-racism and white privilege, and raise awareness of the racial injustices we face in this country. This actually has a major impact on purchasing power. We can support Black women-owned businesses beyond social media by putting our money where our mouth is. If you noticed, Target has been at the forefront of including black-owned businesses on their shelves.

The easiest step to creating a more inclusive world is to support small businesses. Our money makes a difference. By shifting our buying power to minority-owned businesses, we help create employment opportunities and invest in our local communities.

Related links:

Closing the Wealth Gap for Black Women

Janet Bryant Howroyd is the first black woman to own a billion dollar company

Archuleta Chisolm

Archuleta is an author, poet, blogger and host of the FearlessINK podcast. Archuleta’s work centers on black women, mental health and wellness, and inspires people to live their full potential.

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Free Comic Book Day returns to Rochester NH, Albacore, Portsmouth NH https://jmwillowwinds.com/free-comic-book-day-returns-to-rochester-nh-albacore-portsmouth-nh/ Mon, 02 May 2022 09:12:47 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/free-comic-book-day-returns-to-rochester-nh-albacore-portsmouth-nh/ Girl Scouts will offer a kindergarten readiness series in Portsmouth, Dover PORTSMOUTH — Your little girl is about to take a big step! Naturally, you want to do everything possible to prepare her to start kindergarten with confidence. This is where Girl Scouts come in. The Kindergarten Readiness course is free and open to all […]]]>

Girl Scouts will offer a kindergarten readiness series in Portsmouth, Dover

PORTSMOUTH — Your little girl is about to take a big step! Naturally, you want to do everything possible to prepare her to start kindergarten with confidence. This is where Girl Scouts come in. The Kindergarten Readiness course is free and open to all girls entering kindergarten this fall in Portsmouth, Dover and surrounding areas. Make New Friends is a four-part series airing Mondays May 2, 9, 16 and 23 from 6-7 p.m. at Portsmouth Public Library, 175 Parrott Ave., Portsmouth. No membership required. Learn more about the series at https://bit.ly/3t8zER4.

The same series will run on Thursdays May 5, 12, 19 and 26 from 4-5pm at Henry Law Park, 1 Washington St., Dover. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3BtuEJn.

Captain America Jordan White was found at the Jetpack Comics registry in Rochester for Free Comic Book Day last year.  The Free Comic Book Day will take place this Saturday, May 7 in Rochester from 10 a.m.

Artist Susan E. Hanna will be featured in the Local Expert series

DOVER – Join the Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday May 3 for an interactive, step-by-step painting lesson with local artist Susan E. Hanna of SEH Studios. The tutorial will take place from 5-7 p.m. at the Dover Chamber (550 Central Ave., Dover) with the option for participants to attend in person or virtually via Zoom. The cost is $5 for chamber members and $10 for non-members. The program is limited to 24 places so be sure to reserve your place. Participants will be provided with all supplies needed for painting. You can pick up the supplies at SEH Studios (1 Washington St., Mill Building) on ​​Tuesday, May 2 from 4-5 p.m. or Wednesday, May 3 from 12-2 p.m. Visit www.dovernh.org/LES to register or for more information.

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First Lady Fashion: 12 of the most expensive first lady outfits over the years, including Jackie Kennedy and Melania Trump https://jmwillowwinds.com/first-lady-fashion-12-of-the-most-expensive-first-lady-outfits-over-the-years-including-jackie-kennedy-and-melania-trump/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 01:00:36 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/first-lady-fashion-12-of-the-most-expensive-first-lady-outfits-over-the-years-including-jackie-kennedy-and-melania-trump/ The money surrounding her wardrobe is precisely what got Nancy Reagan into trouble. Having been married to President Ronald Reagan, who enjoyed a lavish and glamorous career in Hollywood before his presidency from 1981 to 1989, since 1952 Reagan was known to be very image conscious. As such, her extravagant outfits have come under scrutiny, […]]]>

The money surrounding her wardrobe is precisely what got Nancy Reagan into trouble.

Having been married to President Ronald Reagan, who enjoyed a lavish and glamorous career in Hollywood before his presidency from 1981 to 1989, since 1952 Reagan was known to be very image conscious.

As such, her extravagant outfits have come under scrutiny, in large part because during the eight years her husband was in power, she accepted around US$1 million (approximately $1.85 million now) of designer clothes that she hasn’t paid for.

Reportedly, White House lawyers suggested Reagan watch the price of her clothes, especially when she wasn’t paying for them herself. They said that gifts in the form of suits or dresses from Adolfo in the form of US$50,000 (around $223,000 now) should not appear in the annual presidential financial report, and they also advised him to refuse these gifts.

In 1978, the Ethics in Government Act made it mandatory for senior government officials to report gifts of any kind over $35 (about $50). Reagan tried to make her gifts less frowned upon by donating the clothes to museums, but it backfired and instead made her the subject of intense public criticism, largely because of the price of her clothes. high-end clothing.

Then, in October 1988, it was reported by The Washington Post that secretly, Reagan had borrowed several US$2,000 (about $4,000 now) Adolfo suits and US$22,000 (about $75,300 now) Galanos dresses without reporting them.

Tax experts said she could be found guilty of tax evasion on ‘taxable income’ – that’s what the dresses were considered to be because they couldn’t be classed as gifts due to their extreme price or their loans as the return status was uncertain – but the designers and Reagan clarified that the clothes had been given to him, on the understanding that they were “loans”.

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Next-generation UTA IT training https://jmwillowwinds.com/next-generation-uta-it-training/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 00:00:09 +0000 https://jmwillowwinds.com/next-generation-uta-it-training/ Image: Cesar Torres to see After Credit: UT Arlington A computer scientist from the University of Texas at Arlington is studying how to integrate materials like clay, silicone, glass, biomaterials and textiles with 3D printing technologies. Cesar Torres, an assistant professor in UTA’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, received a three-year, $402,000 grant from […]]]>

Image: Cesar Torres
to see After

Credit: UT Arlington

A computer scientist from the University of Texas at Arlington is studying how to integrate materials like clay, silicone, glass, biomaterials and textiles with 3D printing technologies.

Cesar Torres, an assistant professor in UTA’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering, received a three-year, $402,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the project, which will support interdisciplinary undergraduate research in several creative spaces at UTA, including the landmark UTA FabLab. Chris McMurrough, associate professor of education and senior design director for the department, is co-principal investigator.

The team is setting up an NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates site on campus that will allow 10 undergraduate research students from across the United States to participate in the design and development of the next generation of digital manufacturing workflows.

Age-old processes used by glass and ceramic artists are rarely reflected in today’s digital manufacturing technologies. Torres examines these processes from a design perspective to determine how to integrate technology and traditional techniques.

For example, glassmakers use gestures and movements to make sure everyone knows what’s going on throughout the process. Torres and glass research mentor Justin Ginsberg of UTA’s Department of Art and Art History will guide research that places sensors on bodies, clothing and tools to document the complex movements that occur in UTA’s state-of-the-art hot glass workshop. This data will be used to design learning technologies based on artificial intelligence that provide real-time feedback to novice glassmakers.

Torres is also investigating how materials such as clay and silicon can be used in 3D printing. Printing with clay, for example, allows practitioners to recover from setbacks with simple clay forming techniques. Printing with silicone and conductive silicone also offers unique advantages, including wearable, skin-safe, and functional applications. But using them requires leveraging the workflows of hobbyist communities, such as soap and candle makers, Torres said.

“Most people approach manufacturing from an engineering perspective, but there are ways to integrate technology into old processes and improve manufacturing,” said Torres, who runs The Hybrid Atelier, a creative technology research space. “We invite people traditionally excluded from these conversations to participate in this interdisciplinary approach to innovation.”

Torres’ research has great potential for integrating artificial intelligence into society, according to Hong Jiang, chairman of the computer science and engineering department.

“This is exciting research because it expands the standards of what AI should be, giving us insight into what it could be,” Jiang said. “Dr. Torres is very good at integrating creativity and innovation into technology in ways that make it accessible to everyday people in everyday life.”

  • Written by Jeremy Agor, College of Engineering

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